Word For International Agreements

In secular law, the covenant is used to refer to an official agreement or covenant (“an international covenant on human rights”). It may also apply to a contract or a promise in a contract to perform or not perform an act (“a duty not to sue”). English got the Anglo-French treaty in the 14th century as a word for a binding agreement between two or more people. Its roots go back to the Latin contrahere, which means both “to come together” and “to enter into a relationship or agreement.” The first popular contracts were of a conjugal nature. English took up this German usage around 1900, but applied it mainly to international coalitions of independent private, commercial or industrial companies that were supposed to restrict competition or set prices. U.S. antitrust laws prohibit such cartels or trusts as inhibitors of trade, but they exist internationally, with the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) being perhaps the best known. Another well-known use of the convention is in law and politics, where it is used as a term for an agreement between two or more groups (as countries or political organizations) to resolve issues that concern everyone – for example, the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea. There are also the Geneva Conventions, a series of four international conventions (1864, 1906, 1929, 1949) signed in Geneva, Switzerland, which establish the humanitarian principles that signatory states must treat the military and civilian nationals of an enemy in time of war. A series of international treaties describing how people should be treated when they are prisoners in a war convention is a familiar word for a large gathering of people that usually takes several days to talk about their work or common interests – for example, a teachers` or publishers` convention – or for a common purpose. In politics, a traditional convention is a meeting of delegates of a political party for the purpose of formulating a platform and selecting candidates for a position (for example. B the Democratic/Republican National Convention).

Other conventions are fan-based, and there are countless such conventions that focus on games, comics, and the genres of anime, sci-fi, and horror – to name a few. This use of conventions is consistent with their ancestry. The word comes from the Latin convenire and means “to gather, to gather.” The Latin root also means “to be fit” or “to agree,” which is recognizable in the sense of the word when it comes to established uses, customs, rules, techniques, or practices that are widely accepted and followed. The French word is derived from the Latin compromissum, which itself is related to the earlier participle compromittere (promittere means “promise”). In English, compromit was once used as a synonym for the verb compromised in its outdated sense “to bind by mutual agreement” and in its modern sense “to cause the deficiency of”. This nominal meaning is often used without a qualifying adjective (like good or bad) to indicate that something is being bought or sold at a price below the actual value – in other words, a good deal: “At this price, the house is a good deal” or “We have a good deal for tickets for our flight”. In Middle English, agreen was formed and had the different meanings of “please, satisfy, agree, agree”. It was borrowed from Anglo-French Agreer. This word is composed of a-, a verbose prefix that refers to the Latin ad-, and -greer, a verbal derivative of will, which means “gratitude, contentment, pleasure, pleasure, mitsent”.

The French base is derived from the Latin grātum, the neutral of grātus, which means “grateful, received with gratitude, welcome, pleasant”. Semantically, the etymology of agree is very pleasant. .